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Artist's lifelong attraction to Samurai led him to major weapons collection

Artist's lifelong attraction to Samurai led him to major weapons collection

Brian Snoddy's lifetime focus on Samurai weaponry, which has led to a collection large enough that he is now looking for a museum to display it all, sprang from a second-grade project to create Japanese armor out of paper mache.

Along the way since then, Snoddy became immersed in the Samurai culture that dominated Japan for hundreds of years until the mid-1800s while he also successfully pursued his career as an illustrator.

In the early '90s, Snoddy worked as a comic book artist and on prominent Saturday morning cartoons like Conan the Barbarian, Disney's Gargoyles, Garfield and Friends, X-men, Jim Lee's Wildcats, and Exo-squad.

brainSnoddyThereafter, was also a partner in a successful game company called Privateer Press, which he co-founded and co-guided until selling his share in the game company to help provide the money to build his collection.

He recalls that he bought his first Samurai weapon at the age of 19, a short sword that cost him $350 "at a time when I had $700 to my name." He noted when we visited that Samurai warriors always carried a short and long swo

"I want to start a real museum that is dedicated to the kind of stuff I have, which is a collection that is like nothing in the U.S, that I am aware of," Snoddy said. "There are some very impressive private collections in this country but nothing that is open to the public."

He estimated that his collection, which is stored in his apartment except for a suit of armor that stands beside his desk in his Lynnwood office, is worth about $120,000.

While Snoddy is intent on finding a place for public display of his weaponry, he is also intent on helping attract interest to the time when the Samurai dominated Japanese culture.

"This was an ancient, sophisticated culture that dates back more than 700 years," he said. "It came from the warrior culture of Japan but basically ended in 1876 when Japan decided to modernize, realizing it was out of touch with other countries and cultures, but that also meant modernizing its military."

"It was development that had to happen at some point since Japan had cut itself off from the rest of the world, until Commodore Perry sailed his ships into Tokyo Bay and forced Japan to open itself to the outside world," Snoddy explained, sharing a bit of history.

Snoddy noted that the Samurai made an attempt to come back a few years after they were banned in what is known as the Satsuma Rebellion, a revolt against the imperial government, "but they got annihilated," he said.

He recalled that he bought his first suit of Samurai armor, "probably dating from the 1700s," when he was 25, adding that by then he was also buying sword fittings, such as handles.

"I now have nine suits of armor, five helmets but only two swords, plus a "naginata," which he explained was a pole with a long sword-like curved blade on the end, and I was intrigued to learn when I did a search on "naginata" that it was primarily a weapon of female warriors of the Japanese nobility.

That caused me to chuckle, frankly, as I thought "Ah, a society ahead of its time in some respects."

Snoddy said the place he'd like to find to display his Samurai weaponry "would ideally be a working museum that would include people who could identify artifacts, publish books as well as provide audio and video products and have guest speakers from around the world."

Snoddy is not alone in his interest in the Samurai weaponry. California has two large Japanese sword-owner gatherings: the Northern California Token Kai (Kai means club, Snoddy said) and the Nanka Token Kai, Southern California Japanese Sword Society. Plus, he said, there is a convention in Florida each year.

But those are gatherings of sword owners, not collectors of the full array of weapons.

Snoddy laughed when he shared that his interest in Japanese culture isn't limited to medieval times, since he met his wife, Makiko, there when they were introduced after, as he put it, he was dumped by his Japanese girl friend at the same time she was bemoaning the loss of her U.S. pen pal from whom she was learning English. 

They were married soon after.

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With 'Patriots Day' as backdrop, event honors First Responders

With 'Patriots Day' as backdrop, event honors First Responders

With a backdrop of the movie "Patriots Day," described by its director as "unapologetic in support of law enforcement," a special gathering took place in Seattle last week to honor First Responders, the police and firefighters who are asked to come through in time of crisis. It may have been the first event of its kind and certainly was a first in Seattle.

The event, without advance media hype and with no speeches and no elected officials present to distract from the "thank you" for the honorees, was the idea of Greg Steinhauer, president of American Life, with key support from the Seattle Police Foundation and a few local corporations who put up the money to make the event possible.unnamed 1

The event began at the Cinerama theater, where the movie "Patriots Day," the film about the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing and the subsequent manhunt for the terrorist brothers, was playing. It a wound up with a social gathering at the Westin downtown.

The importance of the movie to Seattle and the First Responders gathering is that Robert Merner, now an assistant police chief in Seattle, is a featured figure in the movie, being the basis for the lead character played by producer and actor Mark Wahlberg as a leader in the effort to find the brothers following the bombing.

Peter Berg, director and one of the writers, said of the film that it was "unapologetic in support of law enforcement," which to some observers accounted for the fact that Patriots Day surprisingly failed to be nominated for Best Picture for the recent Academy Awards.

One writer, discussing the Academy Awards nominations, observed that Patriots Day "Was exactly the movie that America needs right now."

That sense certainly came out when the Boston police officers, following the end of the hunt for the terrorist brothers, were on hand for a Red Sox baseball game and the game was stopped by the Red Sox so those in the stands could say "thank you."

Hard to imagine something like that happening in Seattle, where a police pushback is almost a required reaction in some circles of Seattleites and there is still lingering agitation about accusations of excessive force and abuse prior to a 2012 consent decree that followed Justice Department mandated reforms.

The idea for the gathering of police and firefighters to get to know each other came about at a social gathering where Fire Chief Harold Scoggins, Merner, Avalara CEO Scott McFarland and Wells Fargo's Senior Vice President Tim Brown were visiting.

It came up in conversation that Merner's role in the pursuit of the Boston bombers was being played by Wahlberg. Following that conversation, Debbie Peppa, charged by Steinhauer with putting on last week's event. 

She recalled for me what happened next.

"It didn't take long before the idea was hatched that we should do an event to honor first responder and that the movie would be a great platform to do it, so Scott McFarland and Tim Brown quickly said they would support the event and I was tasked to make it happen," Peppa explained.

"Police Chief (Kathleen) O'Toole was supportive of it immediately as well," she added. "It's my understanding that it's the first time that an event like this was held, just an event to honor the officers and firefighters who risk their lives every day in a political climate that isn't really supportive of what they do so we wanted to send a message that people do recognize what they do."

"But it wouldn't have come about if Mark Pinkowski, chairman of the board for the Police Foundation, hadn't been instrumental in supporting the event, even though he was in Wisconsin dealing with the death of his father," Peppa said. 

Mark Sundberg, president of International Parking Management (IPM), who was one of the sponsors of the gathering, said "It was a phenomenal event and it would be awesome if we could do it again next year and have the general public get the chance to be involved."

In fact a number of the firefighters and officers asked if this could become a yearly event to allow the two departments to mingle and build relationships.

Sundberg made a point of praising what has happened in the department under O'Toole's leadership.

O'Toole, who had headed the Boston police department as well as the Irish national police, was tapped just under three years ago by Mayor Ed Murray after a national search to take over what was a beleaguered department operating under the consent decree that required stiff reforms to combat excessive force and biased policing.

"The police chief is the best thing that has happened in Seattle for a long time," Sundberg told me.

As a bit of background on Assistant Chief Robert Merner, who was the catalyst for the event, he joined the Seattle Police Department two years ago this week from Boston, where he was chief of detectives in the Boston Police Department. In that role he oversaw 800 employees as superintendent of the Bureau of Investigative Services.

Merner, who joined the Boston Police Department in 1986, worked under O'Toole when she served as Boston police commissioner from 2004 to 2006.

O'Toole said at the time of his selection she was unaware that he had applied for the Seattle job until he became a finalist. He told her he didn't alert her of his interest because that would have been inappropriate, she said.

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High court's ruling on new wells stirs concern in Legislature, rural areas

High court's ruling on new wells stirs concern in Legislature, rural areas
The State Supreme Court's decision to assume the role of determining the future course of education funding in this state stirred unrest among those who viewed it as crossing the bounds of separation of powers. But when the court last fall decided which unit of government would monitor the effects of new wells on existing water rights, even one of the Justices raised a red flag about the court's move beyond judicial bounds.

The wells issue is off the visibility radar screen in most parts of the state, but a source of potential crisis in many rural areas. And because of that the lawmakers are pushing back against the court edict because they have the power to do that, unlike the education-funding ruling, now known as the McCleary Decision., where the high court cited constitutional grounds for demanding the legislature do as instructed.

The water issue came about as a 6-3 opinion in a Whatcom County lawsuit with the high court effectively blocking development throughout the state by removing the Department of Ecology from management of water resources relating to individual wells.

The legislative pushback, which would restore the authority over individual wells to the Department of Ecology, took what could be an important step Tuesday night when the Republican-controlled State Senate passed a measure that would put Ecology back in charge.

But the fact that the bill, sponsored by Sen. Judy Warnke, Moses Lake Republican, passed by a 28-21 margin with only two Democrats in support, and that there is no similar measure in the Democrat-controlled House, doesn't provide much confidence for proponents that the problem will be addressed this session.

The Senate bill is now in House hands and because of the complexity of the legislative process, it could still emerge before the Legislature ends.

Meanwhile, the concern about separation of powers continues for those who see both cases involving a high-court overreach.

What the concern over separation of powers means, basically, is that the role of the judiciary is to determine the legality or constitutionality of actions or policies made by the executive or legislative branches. If either legislative or executive branch goes too far, the Judiciary pulls them back where they belong.

The criticism of legal experts, and some in the legislative and executive branches, is that if the court empowers itself to stray into policy matters, there is no way to pull the court back where it belongs. Except the voters, who in a liberal state are not likely to get too upset at the actions of a liberal court.

Interestingly, there is a quiet movement to raise a substantial warchest and ferret out quality court candidates to begin to signal the court that the voters could decide to fill the appropriate role of "judges" of the judiciary.

The dissenting opinion in the water case, written by Justice Debra Stephens, a native of Spokane, described the decision as amounting to "a policy decision that GMA (Growth Management Act) counties should not issue building permits that rely on permit-exempt groundwater withdrawals. This is not a policy decision we are at liberty to make."
The high court's majority opinion, written by Justice Charlie Wiggins, says all formerly permit-exempt well applications must now be examined for impact on senior water rights and that "the GMA explicitly assigns that task to local governments." The effect is to eliminate the category of permit-exempt wells.
But as Justice Stephens points out, the Legislature's intent in creating the exemption category was to save both the applicant and the state the "trouble and expense of processing applications for small withdrawals with little impact on the total water available."
In commenting on the issue, Warnick said "We face a situation where people in rural areas who don't have the luxury of hooking up to city water now have very few options. We are one Washington, but the realities faced by the communities I represent sometimes don't get the attention they deserve. We are talking about families who will now have to pay tens of thousands of more dollars to get water because the state Supreme Court has taken decades of water law and turned it on its head."
An executive of the Association of Washington Counties described the decision as assuring full employment for hydrologists, since each new well application, if Ecology rules no longer prevail, would need to be assessed individually to determine impact on existing water rights.
Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley, noted this decision has kicked off a firestorm around the state" and he referred to it as "a case of the court going beyond interpreting the law to making new law."
Across the state, about 300,000 permit-exempt wells serve 1 million people. Between 2,000 and 8,000 new wells are added each year though drilling a new well does not guarantee legal access to water, according to the Department of Ecology.
Water pulled from these wells represents only about 1 percent of the water consumed in the state.  
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Shabana Khan's squash events brings global visibility to Bellevue

Shabana Khan's squash events brings global visibility to Bellevue
Shabana Khan is known globally in the sport of squash, recognition earned first as a national-champion player and now as a producer of national and international events that include a series of first-time competitive gatherings, all in Bellevue over the next three months. But she faces the frustrating irony that while she is putting the name of the Eastside's largest city on the world squash map, she has generated little attention or support from the city or its leadership.
 
shabanaBut she learned Tuesday that Microsoft has decided to provide a key sponsorship that will ease but not eliminate the financial pressure, as she has raised about $250,000 of a projected $350,000 in costs.
 
The comment about "little attention or support" may seem like a harsh statement, but I've been following Shabana's squash accomplishments since a month before the Men's World Championships in late 2015 when I was asked to help direct her to individuals who might support her efforts.

And except for a donation from developer Kemper Freeman to specifically allow her to say he was a supporter, and an unsuccessful effort by City Councilman Conrad Lee to enlist council financial support for the 2015 men's event, she has gotten only modest backing, mostly "friends and family," as she puts it.

Redmond's PRO Sports, which attracts many Microsoft employees from the campus across the street and where Shabana coaches, has been a key supporter.

In the end, despite the financial challenges faced by her YSK Events company, the men's world event, put on at Meydenbauer Center, came off well, prompting expressions of gratitude from squash participants and executives who gathered in Bellevue from around the world. A Frenchman defeated an Egyptian in the final match to become world champion in a sports event as exciting and competitive as any I've witnessed.

Before getting involved with the Shabana's men's-event initiative, I had little knowledge of squash, which is racket sport similar to racketball, played by two or four players in a four-walled court (glass walls for most international events that are broadcast globally) using a small, hollow rubber ball.

Later, as I learned how many of my friends and colleagues are or were avid squash players, I was informed that squash players and fans represent a highly targeted and sought after demographic of men and women with median incomes of more than $300,000 and an average net worth of nearly $1,500,000.

The website for squash notes: "Squash players are business owners and senior executives in upper management throughout corporate America along with research physicians, architects, attorneys, and accountants."

And Forbes magazine several years ranked squash as "the number one healthiest sport."

Shabana is the kind of business-of-sports figure, a lithe 48 year old who is a former national women's squash champion and one of the best in the world in her playing prime, who would be sought out for encouragement and support in most communities for her leadership role.

Her stature on the national scene of her sport was evidenced when last October, at the National Squash Championship in Philadelphia, she was honored with the award given each year for major administrative contributions to the sport, recognition for the men's world event.

But rather than gathering support, she told me that when she went to Meydenbauer to explore holding the 2017 events there, "They were very adamant for us to move this event to Seattle or some other city."

That prompted Shabana, in seeking another site, to find the Boys and Girls Club in Bellevue's Hidden Valley area, which she enthuses turned out to be a more ideal site, one excited about hosting the events as a showcase for the four-glass-walls court in its new facility.

The capstone of the events this spring is the first Bellevue Squash Classic, the sport's equivalent of a stop on the PGA tour that will bring 16 of the top players in the world to the Pacific Northwest for a $200,000 event described as "possibly the most lucrative event in tour history."

Khan is looking for a major sponsor, as well as event sponsors, for her array of events since Wells Fargo, which had the $25,000 sponsorship and wound up with its name carried around the squash world since all the matches were streamed worldwide, has for various reasons not renewed.

The kind of community support she wishes she could find in Bellevue is something that would be a given in other communities that had the opportunity to have the brass ring as emerging center of what is becoming an increasingly popular sport in many places around the world.

And the growing popularity has apparently seen this country emerge as the third fastest-growing in the world for the sport.

"We support this opportunity to showcase the diversity and talent of these players from around the world," she said. "It's an opportunity to keep politics out and focus on the diversity that brings communities and countries to get together celebrating athleticism and skill."

"Her squash efforts represent an example of cultural experiences that deserve support," Lee said. "We don't have things that attract people from other parts of the world to share and thus this is an important opportunity, particularly the focus on events for young people."

And the focus on young people will be highlighted by the second West Coast College Showcase, a new event she created last year to expose what she describes as "unfound squash talent" to college coaches from around the country who gather to find the young people they want to recruit.

YSK Events, which she founded three years ago to focus on squash events, is a family affair in several ways. She serves as CEO while her younger brother, Murad, serves as president, and sister Latasha, who was women's national champion when Shabana defeated her to take the crown, is vice president for business development. It's also a family affair in that the "Y" in YSK stands for both her 10-year-old daughter, Yasmine, who is 15th in the country in her age group, and her father, Yusuf, who was nine-time India champion when the Seattle Tennis Club hired him in 1968 to come to Seattle to be head tennis pro. The "S" and the "K" are her initials.

I learned the import of the name Khan because of an exchange with my former UPI boss, now retired in Connecticut, who reached out to me after my first column on Shabana in late 2015 and shared that the reason I couldn't get hold of him during the afternoons, when I would call his New York office from Los Angeles was that "we were all out playing squash."

But when I was told him I was going to take some squash lessons from Shabana, he said: "Are you telling me you are going to get private lessons from a member of the Khan family? You can't know how jealous I am."
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Joe Galloway's 'hard duty' eulogy for friend, Hal Moore, of Vietnam battle fame

Joe Galloway's 'hard duty' eulogy for friend, Hal Moore, of  Vietnam battle fame

Dear Joe,

Joseph L. Galloway's Seattle interviews with Vietnam veterans from this state two years ago made them part of a 50-year commemoration of those who fought in that war but were never thanked. I was reminded of Galloway's time here when I received the email this week that he has the "hard duty" of a eulogy Friday for the man who for half a century had been his partner in keeping alive the memory of the "defining battle" of that war.

Retired Lt. Gen. Harold G. "Hal" Moore, who as a lieutenant colonel led units of the 7thCavalry Regiment in the first major battle against the North Vietnamese army at a place called the Ia Drang Valley, died this week, two days before his 95th birthday.

galloway 69Joe Galloway 1969Joe Galloway was a UPI reporter who traded his camera for a machine gun as the battle swirled around him with Moore's unit confronted by a superior force of North Vietnamese regulars.

Galloway proceeded to rescue two wounded soldiers under fire during that climactic four-day battle, fighting that claimed 234 Americans, but was estimated to have cost the lives of several thousand North Vietnamese in two landing zones in November of 1965.

Joe Galloway in SeattleJoe Galloway in Seattle"Those of us who survived Landing Zone X-Ray survived because of his brilliance of command. I think every one of us thought we were going to die at that place except Hal Moore. He was certain we were going to win that fight and he was right," Galloway was quoted in a national news story this week.

Galloway's email to me and a group of former UPI colleagues read:

"I will do the eulogy, as I promised Hal more than 20 years ago that I would. But it's hard duty. "He was my best friend for more than half a century." The memorial for Moore will be at the National Infantry Museum at Fort Benning Army Base in Columbus, GA.

Ia Drang began a relationship between Galloway and Moore that extended over more than five decades and involved co-authoring two books, including We Were Soldiers Once...and Young and the movie made from it, We Were Soldiers.  

I write about Galloway in this Harp because he had an impact on many people in the Seattle area during a key stop here on his travels around the country as he was, in essence, revisiting that war in memory and emotion, interviewing veterans of that conflict. The 100 or so interviews prior to his Seattle visit, and the more than 300 total, have been part of the 50-year Vietnam Commemoration initiated by the Defense Department, not to celebrate the war but those who fought there.

Galloway's impact was not just with those he interviewed or the several interviews that Q13 Fox did with him as well as those he interviewed. I had the opportunity for question-and-answer sessions with him at Seattle Rotary and at a special breakfast session at the Columbia Tower Club.

Q13 Fox made its facilities available for the interviews, 60- to 90-minute videos that Galloway hopes will be "the body of material for future generations who want to know what this war was all about."

Among the interviewees was Bruce Crandall, made famous by the book and the movie as the helicopter pilot who, with his wingman Ed "Too Tall" Freeman, made as many as 20 trips to a landing zone that was constantly under withering enemy fire to bring in supplies and remove the wounded.

Crandall, who lives in Kitsap County, was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2007 for his exploits, as was Freeman in 2001. Freeman died in 2008. Crandall will also be at the memorial service for Moore in Georgia this week.

Galloway and Moore wrote a second book, We Are Soldiers Still, which he said grew out of a journey back to the battlefields of Vietnam 25 years later. "We went back and walked those old battlefields. At the end of the day, Hal Moore and Col. Nguyen Huu An, the North Vietnamese commander, stood in a circle in the clearing and prayed for the souls of every man who died on both sides."

Galloway, and historians after him, described the battle of the Ia Drang Valley as defining, even though the war dragged on for another eight years before the end of U.S. involvement, and 10 years until the actual fall of Saigon.

It was defining, Galloway wrote, because it "convinced Ho (Chi Minh), (General) Giap and (Defense Secretary Robert S.) McNamara the U.S. could never win." The realization of both sides was that the American citizenry would not accept for a long period the pace of casualties that the companion battles in the Ia Drang Valley produced. 

In his ultimate rejection of LBJ, Galloway wrote: "Although President Johnson, having listened to McNamara's sense that we couldn't win in Viet Nam, no matter how many men we sent there, huddled with his key Advisors and they determined: 'send the soldiers anyway.'"

During one of the interviews while he was in Seattle, Galloway said of the veterans he was interviewing: "They are not bitter but I am bitter in their behalf. It make me angry that those who came to hate the war came to hate the warriors who were their sons and daughters."

One of the more emotional moments for Galloway came during our interview at the Tower Club when someone in the audience asked about Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, who had once described Galloway as "the soldier's reporter" because of his caring and regard for those he wrote about in battle.

Galloway recalled the time he had gotten a call from Schwarzkopf, who over the course of Galloway's coverage of wars extending through Afghanistan had become his close friend. The general wanted to know how Moore, who had been Schwarzkopf's tactical officer at West Point when he was a cadet, was doing.

"I told him Hal was having trouble with his memory," Galloway recalled. "So am I Joe," he quoted Schwarzkopf as replying. "So you better get down to here to Tampa so I can buy you a beer before I forget who you are.'"

It was a tearful moment not just for Galloway but for some of the military people in the audience as Galloway noted that Schwarzkopf, who had commanded all coalition forces in the gulf war, was suffering from both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's and died not long after the 2012 telephone conversation.

When I took Galloway back to head for the airport, he promised to return to Seattle for more interviews, a promise I am pressing to hold him to.  

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Laureates chosen for Business Hall of Fame 30th anniversary

Screen Shot 2017 02 09 at 4.47.32 PMTwo men who teamed with close business partners to build companies that became national leaders in their industries, a member of one of Seattle's most prominent families, and a woman who guided one of the region's best-known law firms will be the 2017 honorees of the Puget Sound Business Hall of Fame. The event celebrates its 30th anniversary this year.


The four whose lifetime of contributions to business will be celebrated at the Business Hall of Fame banquet on May 4 at the Seattle Waterfront Marriott are: Judith (Judy) Runstad, Carl Behnke, Artie Buerk and Don Nielsen.

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Judy Runstad 

--Runstad, an attorney who became the first female managing partner of a major Seattle law as co-managing partner of Foster Pepper and went on to chair the Federal Reserve Board as well as serve two governors by chairing special commissions and serve on the boards of three public companies.


                                                    

behnke

 

Carl Behnke  

--Carl Behnke built the second largest Pepsi dealership in North America. Then he subsequently partnered with his wife, Renee, to create Sur La Table, which bills itself the ultimate place for kitchen exploration and discovery and had grown to one of the nation's largest specialty cookware companies by the time they sold it in 2011 to an international investment bank. Behnke's late uncle, David (Ned) Skinner, is a Hall of Fame laureate.
          
                                               

Buerk

 

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--Buerk, who became known as the "catalyst of ventures and connector of people," had many high points in his career. But a key one was when he partnered in the late '70s with old friend Chuck Barbo to build Shurgard into a nationwide storage company. Barbo was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

 

Nielsen

 

Donald Nielsen 

--Nielsen, who teamed with Kirby Cramer to co-found what became the world's largest contract biological and chemical research and testing company, Hazleton Laboratories Corp. Nielsen joins Cramer, his frequent business
partner over the years, in the Hall of Fame. Cramer was inducted in 2009. 


The Puget Sound Business Hall of Fame was launched in 1987 by Puget Sound Business Journal and Junior Achievement of Greater Puget Sound to be patterned after the National Business Hall of fame that had been created a decade earlier by Junior Achievement and Fortune Magazine.

After the first Seattle event, where eight honorees included four who had been inducted into the national Business Hall of Fame so were automatic inclusions in the local Hall of Fame, I was asked by several business leaders who wondered if we would have enough prospects to carry on for very many years.

The question has been answered many times over in the three decades since then and the induction of the 2017 foursome will bring to 122 the number of business leaders who have been singled out for the honor. Past honorees have represented virtually every business sector, and while many were lawyers by profession who moved into the top ranks of business and made their impacts, Runstad is the first laureate to be honored for her contributions as an attorney.

Thus the vignettes of each of the laureates that are the feature of the banquet have, because of the extensive research that goes into each of the videos produced by KCPQ-13 as a key partner with JA and PSBJ, have contributed to an understanding of the business history of this region.

And the Q-13 videos, as well as the profiles contained each year in the Business Journal'sspecial editorial section focusing on the Hall of Fame event, represent the history of the Puget Sound business community through the collective stories of the laureates.

The laureates are chosen by a selection committee chaired by Business Journal Publisher Emory Thomas and includes JA Washington President David Moore, Q-13 Vice President Pam Pearson, as well as Neil McReynolds, John Fluke, past laureates Herb Bridge, Woody Howse and the undersigned.

Runstad served on corporate boards, a variety of gubernatorial commissions and, perhaps most prominently, was on the board, and in 1997 chaired, the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She was chair of the conference of chairs that year.

She was on the board of directors of Wells Fargo & Co., Potlatch Corp. and Safeco Corp.

She chaired two gubernatorial boards, serving as co-chair of Gov. Gary Locke's Washington Competitiveness Council, and Gov. Christine Gregoire's Global Competitiveness Council, and served as a board member of a half dozen other gubernatorial councils.  

Buerk teamed with Barbo to take a self-storage business they had, renamed it Shurgard, and built a nationwide brand, raising $750 million for expansion through what was described as "a vast constellation of brokered deals." 

He helped take the company public in 1994 then moved on, three years later co-founding the private equity firm, Buerk Craig Victor, which became Buerk Dale Victor and is now Montlake Capital. 

Despite his successes in the corporate world, many will say Buerk will be best remembered for his support of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurism. His own view is that "My whole life has revolved around startups and small businesses, the engines of the Northwest economy." 

That lifelong involvement eventually led to the entrepreneurial center at the University of Washington being named the Arthur W. Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship in honor of both his involvement and of the $5.2 million gift from the Buerks to finance its future.

Nielsen partnered with Kirby Cramer in 1969 to launch Environmental Sciences Corp., a $200,000 startup in a garage. Over the following 14 years, after moving the company to Vienna, VA., the two built what they renamed Hazleton Laboratories Corp., into the world's largest contract biological and chemical research and testing company.

They took Hazleton public in 1983 and it was purchased in 1987 by Corning, which kept Nielsen on as president until 1992, when he retired and turned his focus to education reform, which has remained his focus as he has become a sought-after opinion leader and author on education change.

Behnke, as CEO, guided ALPAC as a Pepsi dealership that, but the time it was purchased by Pepsi, had become the second largest dealership in the nation with revenue in excess of $130 million annually. Then he teamed with his wife, Renee, to build Sur La Table into a national company. He sits on various corporate boards, as well as chairing the Skinner Corporation. The names Behnke and Skinner being among the best-known business and philanthropic families in the region.

Behnke's resume is filled with community and philanthropic involvements, as is the case with the other laureates. It's important to note that laureate selections are based solely on contributions to business and the economy, since other organizations and events focus on philanthropic contributions, although community involvement is part of the life commitment of most laureates chosen over the years.

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Rubber Soldiers details how Brazil and its citizens helped Allies win World War II

My friend Gary Neeleman has breached what he refers to as the "linguistic tomb" with his forthcoming book, Rubber Soldiers. It's an exhaustive look, with much of the information translated from Portuguese, at how his beloved Brazil and its citizens were instrumental in helping the allies defeat Axis forces in World War II.

With the Kool Aid of nationalism becoming the political cocktail of choice for many in this country, it may be an appropriate time to learn that without the key role played by a much smaller country as partner, the most powerful nation on earth might well have been halted in its drive to defeat Nazi Germany. The partner was the largest nation on the other American continent.

Neeleman, from six decades of involvement in and with Brazil, has always believed the interests of what he refers to as "the two giants of the western hemisphere."were intertwined in an unusual and mutually beneficial relationship. But nothing could give form to that belief more than the story of the 55,000 Brazilians who trekked or were taken into the Amazon jungles to tap latex to produce the rubber that the Allies needed for their war machine.

 
garyandroseneelemanNeeleman, now Honorary Consul of Brazil, is a former colleague at United Press International and a close friend for 45 years, dating back to not long after he returned from Brazil where he had been UPI manager in the 1960s. I focus on him and his book in thisHarp not only because of that friendship but because his three books (Rubber Soldiers is the third) chronicle previously little-known aspects of the relations between the two nations.what he refers to as "the two giants of the western hemisphere."

The story of the Rubber Soldiers begins soon just after Pearl Harbor, when ninety-seven percent of all of the natural rubber in the world, mostly grown in Asia, was in the hands of the Japanese. Since rubber was an essential ingredient for mounting an effective war machine, that created a crisis in 1942 for the Allied war effort.

President Roosevelt reached out to Brazilian President Getulio Vargas, whose county had once been the source of most rubber in the world before the arrival of rubber in Indonesia in the early twentieth century put Brazil out of the rubber business, though the trees remained in the Amazon jungles.

Although Hitler made a major effort to convince Brazil to come into the Nazi sphere, Roosevelt and Vargas reached an agreement, including U.S. payment of $120 million, that led to the U.S. establishing air and naval bases in Brazil and the "Rubber Army" being dispatched up the Amazon to bring rubber out to satisfy the needs of the Allies.

Neeleman, whose fluency in Portuguese dated from his time as a Mormon missionary, was Brazil manager for UPI from 1958 to 1966 and eventually became UPI manager for Latin America and the Caribbean area.

It was because of those years in Brazil that Neeleman became aware of parts of history in that nation, history about which he uses the phrase "linguistic tomb" to characterize the challenge the Portuguese-language barrier posed for researchers and academics learning about that Brazilian history.

Because son David, first of the Neelemans' children to be born in Brazil, founded and remains a major shareholder of Jet Blue and now guides his fast-growing Brazilian airline Azul, the Neelemans (Gary 82 and Rose 81) have little problem with the cost of their travels from their home in the Salt Lake City area to Brazil. They have three trips planned this year, more to promote his now three books on Brazil in travels around that country than doing additional research.

There is a dark side to the tale of the heroic Rubber Soldiers in that the Brazilian government failed to fulfill its promise to pay for the return home of those citizens.

Thus many of the soldiers who survived, although perhaps half died from yellow fever, malaria, dengue, beriberi and dozens of other jungle afflictions and creatures during their four years harvesting rubber, could not afford to leave the jungle to return home.

There were accusations that the U.S. had failed to honor its promises to provide funds to Brazil, though a couple of years ago that country began remitting 25,000 reals (roughly $7,800) to the survivors and their dependents.

The money was welcome, as the men are elderly and most are frail. But many of them said that this amount was a pittance meant to silence them and did not fulfill the promises made to them when they signed up.

It was while Gary and Rose were searching the Brazilian backcountry for information for their second book, Tracks in the Amazon, that they began to learn about the rubber soldiers.

Tracks in the Amazon was about construction in the early years of the twentieth century of a railroad to traverse the most dense tropical jungle on earth, along the Madeira River then down the Amazon, to bring the rubber to ships, a project once bankrupt but eventually resurrected and completed, at a cost of 10,000 workers who lost their lives. Then the rubber trade died.

The story of the old railroad inspired Tracks in the Amazon, but the Neelemans found the story of the train was also intertwined with the story of the rubber soldiers.

Inspiration for Rubble Soldiers emerged, says Neeleman, "after countless interviews with survivors of the rubber army, now in their nineties. The persistent question from these men was 'when will the United States pay us for our sacrifice?'"

"We feel this book answers this question and for the first time provides a clear picture of the relationship between the United States and Brazil during the war years," Neeleman said, including details of Brazil's rebuff of Hitler.

Neeleman says the book, which will be published in May and is in pre-sale on Amazon, "finally puts to rest the questions of 'did the US pay for the rubber?' and among other things, it documents the money trail with official papers from the files of the United States Senate never before seen."

"As we pursued information for the book, we became very attached to these old rubber tappers and their descendants and found many hundreds of new friends in this remote area of the world," Neeleman notes.

Neeleman's 63-year relationship with Brazil is much like a love affair with a nation and its people, beginning in 1954 when he arrived as a 20-year-old Mormon missionary.

He has been recognized repeatedly in Brazil for his work over six decades toward enhancing the friendship between the nation of his birth and the one where three of his children were born. Most prominent of those recognitions was in September of 2015 when he was honored in the main hall at the City of Sao Paulo as the fourth recipient of the Sao Paulo Citizen Award, joining the Pope, the Dalai Lahma and the founder of the Mormon Church in Brazil as the only other recipients. 

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'Super Slow,' high-intensity training an intriguing approach to conditioning

Despite the fact it's now possible to find a book, online promotion or latest expert touting the value of virtually every form of exercise or workout regimen, the routine known as "super slow" has stood the test of time, gathering evangelical adherents across the country though being only vaguely familiar to many people.

Ann-Marie Garrett-Anderson chuckles at that reality as she talks about her quarter century ann marieexperience guiding clients through the few-minutes-a-week routine called High Intensity Training that is taken from the "SuperSlow" process devised more than 40-plus years ago by high-intensity guru Ken Hutchins.

Hutchins defined and popularized his trademarked SuperSlow form of resistance training exercise and developed methodology, trainer certifications and exercise equipment working specifically with Nautilus, the exercise-equipment manufacturer that had developed :"strength training principles."

The bible of the high-intensity disciples is Body by Science, co-authored by Doug McGuff, M.D., who throughout his medical career has maintained a focus on high-intensity exercises culminating in the late '90s with his opening Ultimate Exercise, his own high-intensity gym.

Ann-Marie's late husband, Greg, was in the forefront of the nationally recognized evangelists of the high-intensity regimen and she is now on the list of most recognized practitioners.

It was with the guidance of friends that I discovered Ann-Marie, and her Ideal Exercise gym, first facility west of the Mississippi to employ the SuperSlow approach, as I sought ways to treat my body in a manner that hopefully maintains its performance despite advancing age.

But as I came to learn about SuperSlow, I have been surprised that it has gained so little visibility if for no other reason than its role as a process proven to combat osteoporosis in the elderly.

A key challenge for higher visibility for Super Slow, the High Intensity Training routine as applied in the Seattle and Bellevue gyms that Anderson and her late husband Greg founded 23 years ago, is that the 10- to 12-minutes a week approach isn't likely to be promoted by conventional gyms or fitness clubs. The goal of such facilities, obviously, is to build clientele who maximize rather than minimize use.

Another is the challenge of a counterintuitive idea that a few minutes a week can keep the body highly fit.

"When a wife or husband comes in, the spouse almost routinely teases about 'you can't do anything in 10 minutes a week," Anderson says with a laugh. "But eventually the spouse sees the results and comes in themselves."

But once attracted, the staying power of the workout routine on the array of Nautilus devices is dramatic.

"I have eight clients who've done the whole 23 years and most clients have been with us for more than 10 years," Anderson says. "For some families, where children as young as 12 and the parents train with us, we're kind of their primary health care."

SuperSlow workouts, which are actually high-intensity, slow-motion strength training, typically consist of one set on each of five or six Nautilus units, each set carried out to complete muscle fatigue. Hutchins recommends performing each set for between 100 and 240 seconds, depending on the exercise and the subject's capability.

Obviously, the weight on my sets is well below the weight on the units for the high school and college athletes training there.

Interestingly, It's probably the only activity where the point is to fail, no matter what your performance capabilities.

Take the example of the leg press, doing six to nine repetitions over a couple of minutes, until your leg muscles are burning and you want to quit, but you have to continue until you physically can't complete another, and that's the point where you fail. Your legs feel like noodles. Then on to the next machine, until a full body workout of repeated "failures" is achieved.

As Anderson explained to me prior on my first visit: since the body is being stressed to the max, rest and recovery are essential. She recommends almost a week for recovery, explaining that when the body is rested, it adapts to the overload and is able to do more the next time. Thus a few more pounds for each machine and an additional repetition await on the next visit to her gym.

The way osteoporosis came into the equation is when Hutchins and his wife, in 1982, conducted the "Nautilus osteoporosis study" at the University of Florida Medical School and found that the slow-moving, controlled-exercise approach was effective in building bone density in elderly women with osteoporosis.

Entrepreneur Sandy Wheeler, the founder of equipment maker BowFlex, which owned Nautilus for a number of years, recalled in a telephone conversation that the company did a project with Tufts University to measure how use of the equipment improved the bone density of people in their 80s and 90s.

As I was researching the whole high-intensity thing, I ran across an interesting explanation from one expert: "there's an inverse relationship between exercise duration and intensity. Meaning, if you run for a long time, it must be low intensity--you can't sprint for miles. If you do sprint--which is high intensity--it must be a short distance. It's the same with high-intensity strength training."

Or as Anderson put it:" You can train hard or you can train long. It's physically impossible to do both. When you move slowly, your muscles can't rely on momentum, so they are forced to work harder through the entire range of motion."

Early on, I questioned Anderson about how focus on muscle-strengthening exercises benefitted cardio maintenance, to which she replied: "the muscular system is the only path into all the other systems from respiratory to cardio-vascular to endocrine and skeletal.

"When you work the muscular system to capacity and get as strong as you can, all the other systems up-regulate to support that muscular system," she added.

There has apparently been a resurgence of interest in the "SuperSlow" approach, not surprising with people facing busier schedules and retirees living longer and seeking to stay fit into older age.

Normal 0 false false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE As a result, Anderson is creating a certification program for employees that could allow her to expand beyond her two Seattle-area gyms as well as focus on outreach to specific audiences and age groups.

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Alaska's Cuba service recalls Russia Far East venture

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Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE It was logical and appropriate that the first air carrier to connect the Western United States to Cuba should be Alaska Airlines, given that carving out new frontiers and seeking new challenges has been the culture of the airline over its eight-plus decades.

“As we kick off our 85th anniversary year, the inauguration of Cuba service marks the latest in some fascinating twists and turns to our route network,” said Joe Sprague, Alaska’s senior vice president for external relations.

Indeed the Cuba service launch brought back particular memories of Alaska’s far-out decision a quarter century ago to begin regular service to the Russian Far East, seizing what was then a thawing of relations between the two countries and the emergence of the Seattle area as a key player in that relationship that was beginning to verge on friendship.

Back in 1991, Seattle had already hosted the Goodwill Games competition between the U.S. and Russia, and business relations were being pursued. So Alaska launched summer service that year to Magadan, a sister city to Anchorage, and Khabarovsk, described as a European-style interior city that was the commercial and industrial hub for Russia’s Far East.

Part of the U.S.-Russia relations that emerged prompted creation of the Foundation for Russian American Economic Cooperation FRAEC), whose then-president Carol Vipperman recalled in an email exchange this week “the Alaska flights to the Russian Far East were very meaningful to both sides.”

The challenges of some of Alaska’s early flights, eventually extending to five cities in the rugged Far East of Russia, could provide comedy-script material, but also confirmed the pioneering spirit of Alaska’s people.

The inaugural flight to Magadan, 400 miles south of the Arctic Circle, turned up the fact the airport had no de-icing service. It was reported the pilot rounded up every bottle of vodka available and sprayed it on the wings with a garden hose.

And when Alaska launched service to Petropavlovsk, the largest city on the Kamchatka Peninsula, as the inaugural flight loaded with dignitaries was about to land, ground authorities told the pilot he did not have landing rights so the Alaska jet was forced to turn around and return to Anchorage.

Alaska was forced to end the service, on which the airline insisted it made money over the nearly a decade of doing business, when the Russian economy collapsed in 1998.

Vipperman recalls being on the next-to-last flight, with long-time Secretary of State Ralph Munro and some Alaska officials.

“We had come from a bilateral meeting, and at the Kamchatka airport we were taken off the plane to meet with the governor of Kamchatka and other officials so that we could talk about the impact the closure would have on their region,” she recalled in our email exchange. “While we sipped vodka, the plane sat on the tarmac waiting for us to come back.”

“I was personally sad to see the service to the Russian Far East end,” she added.

Alaska’s innovative outreach to the Russian Far East actually went back almost two decades earlier, in the early ‘70s, when the still young carrier began charter service to the Soviet Union’s Siberia as a result of what have been described as “secret negotiations” between the airline and Soviet Authorities.

When the U.S. Department of State learned of the deal, it decided not to block the plan, indicating it didn’t want to create a negative response from the Soviet Union. It might also be assumed the agency wanted to avoid a negative response from Washington State’s two U.S. senators, Warren Magnuson and Henry Jackson, then among the Senate’s most powerful members.

I emailed Sprague for some thoughts on the service that began in the ‘90s.

“The service to the Russian Far East was really something,” said Sprague, who was then with an Anchorage-based regional airlines. “It still amazes me to look at the map and think how far away from home base we were flying our old MD-80s for that service.”

Sprague noted Alaska’s long history of connecting communities, with the Russian Far East and now Cuba as key pieces, but also including launch of service to resort cities in Mexico, Hawaii, then points to the East Coast and Midwest.

The latest, of course, being the merger with Virgin America, which will create Alaska linkage of all the major cities on the West Coast.

“Our various moves have been good for the company, but we also like to think they have been good for the communities we serve,” Sprague said.

An example of serving communities is the fact that, despite filling it planes with passengers destined for popular vacation and business destinations, the airline continues to serve a special role in the infrastructure of the state where it was born as an airline connecting remote locations.

As Sprague noted: “We are proud that we still serve 19 points within the state of Alaska, only three of which are connected to the road system.”

 

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Four entrepreneurs who created Washington wine industry


 
The young entrepreneurs who bought the state's main winery with money they didn't really have then gave their wine a name that became the soul of what would eventually be a dramatically successful industry represent the little-known "rest of the story" of Washington wine.

      
     Kirby Cramer
Details of the story were recalled by two of those four entrepreneurs after they read last week Flynn's Harp, which focused on Ste. Michelle Wine Estates and the role its president and CEO, Ted Baseler, has played in presiding since 2001 over the growth and success of the company and its impact as leader of the Washington wine industry.
                                                            
   
      Don Nielsen
The four were typical of the young entrepreneurs coming of age in the pre-high tech early '70s in this state who wrote their own success stories in industries ranging from coffee (as in Starbucks' Howard Schultz) to retailing (the Nordstrom third generation took the company public) to medical instruments (Wayne Quentin and Hunter Simpson).

As detailed last week, the 1967 Washington Legislature had approved a bill to, for the first time, permit California and other quality wines to be sold on retail shelves alongside the basically fruity wines produced by the couple of wineries located in this state. At some point, the Washington wine industry would have to change to survive.

The four who emerged to save the wine industry became dramatically successful in various business sectors over the coming years. Wally Opdyke, Kirby Cramer, Don Nielsen and Mike Garvey came up with the money to buy American Wine Growers, a producer of mostly fruity wines with high alcohol content that Nielsen referred to jokingly as "skid road" wine.

Nielsen and Cramer, with Garvey and Opdyke as investors, had already formed a young company called Environmental Sciences in 1969 to take advantage of the need for high-quality rat cages for the pharmaceutical industry, becoming eventually the largest in that industry.

Then Opdyke, the only one who had much knowledge of or interest in wine, convinced the three friends to join in putting up the $100,000 necessary to buy the $3 million-revenue American Wine Growers, its winery and acreage.

Cramer recalled, in an interview this week, that the families who had owned AWG for years were convinced to sell the business for $3 million and the purchase took place after Cramer and Opdyke convinced Seattle First National Bank and an insurance company to each put $1.5 million with plant and acreage as collateral.

"We basically bought it on our good looks." Cramer chuckled, "but we thought it would be an interesting investment and Wally was a marketing genius, leading us to change the name to Ste. Michelle Vintners, start putting corks in the bottles, and started work on the chateau that is now the company's headquarters."

Meanwhile, knowing that creating quality red wine would take several years, Wally, as president of the company, guided growing and bottling of riesling, a white-grape with what Cramer referred to as a quick turnaround time.
In what Cramer described as "a marketing coup," Opdyke entered the Ste. Michelle riesling in a California wine competition and it took the gold medal.

"For a Washington wine to take the gold medal in a California competition in the early '70s was something no one could have imagined," Cramer said. "The gold medal made the Washington wine industry."
The legacy of that marketing coup is that today Ste. Michelle is the nation's leading producer of riesling.

Under Opdyke's leadership, the four put together a prospectus looking to raise $3 million to grow the company with more land, grape growing and production. Cramer recalls putting together an eye-catching prospectus cover that displayed a number of wine labels, including the new label for Ste. Michelle.

The four would be the first to concede that luck plays a huge role in success. But not the roll-the-dice kind, but rather where preparation meets opportunity. So it was with the four, over the years, prepared t seize opportunities that came their way.

Thus the prospectus, instead of landing in the hands of prospective investors, which Cramer admits now probably weren't many, the prospectus landed on the desk of a top executive at U.S. Tobacco, which was seeking to diversify at the time. Before long the deal had been struck that paid off the loans and left the entrepreneurs with $4 million in stock to share 18 months after their $100,000 investment.

"The dividends the year after the sale equaled my original investment," Nielsen quipped.
Having overseen dramatic growth for Environmental Sciences Corp, in 1972 they purchased Hazleton Laboratories from TRW and took the name of Hazleton, a contract laboratory that conducted toxicology testing. They took Hazleton public in 1977, had additional stock offerings in '78 and '80.

By 1982 Hazleton had become the largest independent biological testing company and life sciences laboratory in the United States, as well as the largest manufacturer of laboratory equipment in the world.

Garvey, who in 1996 launched a law firm that would become one of the most respected in the Northwest, and Opdyke were involved in the purchase of K2, which had been bought by Cummins Diesel from founder Bill Kirschner, who had bought it back. And the four also bought some 140 condos at a Colorado resort from Ralston Purina.

"It became the big thing in the early '70s for big corporations to think they should diversify and so they bought businesses they knew nothing about and eventually new leadership would ask 'what are we doing with this' and would sell it off for a cheap price," Nielsen observed. "Entrepreneurs looked for those and that's how we got into K2 and Colorado condos."

In 1987, Corning, Inc., purchased Hazleton but retained Nielsen as CEO for five years and when he retired in 1992, Hazleton had grown to $165 million in sales and employed 2,500 people in five countries on three continents. 
For the past approximately three decades, Nielsen and Cramer have continued to guide companies and serve on numerous boards while Garvey proceeded to build Garvey Schubert and Barder into one of the region's most respected law firms. Opdyke stayed for some years at the helm of Ste. Michelle before becoming closely involved in a corporate role with U.S. Tobacco.

Cramer was named a few years ago as a laureate of the Puget Sound Business Hall of Fame. Nielsen was selected this week to join the Business Hall of Fame as a 2017 laureate and will be honored in May at the annual induction ceremonies.

 

 


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